Inclusion needs exclusion: Waleed Salem, ‘Who is Eligible to Exist? The Dynamics of Inclusion and Exclusion of Settler Colonialism: The Case of Palestine, PhD dissertation, Near East University, 2019

27Oct19

Abstract: This PhD thesis aims to expand on the ‘logic of elimination’ of the settler colonial projects by analyzing in depth its dynamics of inclusion and exclusion, who is eligible to exist, and /or to be counted in these projects with a specific focus on Palestine as a case study; compared with three cases of The United States, South Africa and Ireland/ Northern Ireland.The thesis assumed that the Zionist project is characterized by ‘Demographic Elimination’ as the main feature of its inclusion and inclusion dynamics, combining the erasure of the land: place, space, territory, and the landscape; together with the displacement of the indigenous population internally and externally, and the replacement of them by settler colonialists brought from outside. These processes were practiced during the period of the Zionist Settler colonial project in Palestine in the 19th century leading to the establishment of the Israeli State in 1948,and continued after 1948 and 1967 by that State of Israel as being a “Settler Colonial State” in expansion. These methods are implemented in the frameworks of belligerent occupation, Apartheid, and Settler/ Internal Colonialism, combined with the structures of “Settler Democracy” and “Herrenvolk Democracy” that are both ethnically exclusive to the other politically, legally, economically (Through the settler colonial political economy), socially, and culturally. Since the 1940s the United States of America played the role as a ‘mother country’ to Israel and its settler colonial inclusion and exclusion ongoing project. Previously Britain played the mother country role. Before that the Evangelical Americans, German and the British created a Zionist Approach to conquer and settler Palestine in the early nineteenth century before Zionism emerged. The study is going over five chapters, and ends with a brief overview of the possibilities for decolonization, and for re-inclusion. 



%d bloggers like this: